Episodes

Behind the Scenes with Selene Lacayo, author of Immigration

How do you distill an immigration story into a tight, accessible piece? Tune in to this episode where Selene lets us in on her secrets. This is Selene’s second piece on the audio mag. You can check out her first piece Amalgam here.

Selene Lacayo is a writer and translator living in the Greater Philadelphia Area. She was the 2018 Judge’s Choice Runner-Up for the Write Michigan Short Story Contest. Her essays have been published by InCulture Magazine, Americans Resisting Overseas, and the COVID-19 Community Stories of the Grand Rapids Public Museum. Most recently, her short story Amalgam formed part of The Best Short Stories of Philadelphia published in 2021 and her interview with Silvia Moreno-Garcia on her novel Velvet Was the Night was featured in Electric Literature. She is currently working on a memoir centered around the themes of belonging, identity and motherhood. You can follow her work at SeleneLacayo.com.

Nonfiction: Immigration by Selene Lacayo

“Alien: *unfamiliar and disturbing or distasteful. Similar: foreign, strange, bizarre, exotic, incompatible with, antagonistic to, unacceptable to 2 …

(Footnote 2) I hated that label –alien— stuck to my forehead upon my landing in the U.S. “Your looks are so exotic.” “Your accent is unusual for a Hispanic,” people would say. I felt belittled.”

This piece first appeared in Alebrijes Review and was nominated for a Pushcart award.

Selene Lacayo is a writer and translator living in the Greater Philadelphia Area. She was the 2018 Judge’s Choice Runner-Up for the Write Michigan Short Story Contest. Her essays have been published by InCulture Magazine, Americans Resisting Overseas, and the COVID-19 Community Stories of the Grand Rapids Public Museum. Most recently, her short story Amalgam formed part of The Best Short Stories of Philadelphia published in 2021 and her interview with Silvia Moreno-Garcia on her novel Velvet Was the Night was featured in Electric Literature. She is currently working on a memoir centered around the themes of belonging, identity and motherhood. You can follow her on Twitter at @LacayoSelene and on her website at

Behind the Scenes with Michael Pacheco, author of En Plena Vista

What do briefs (not that kind) and boxing have to do with writing great short stories? Tune in as Michael reveals all.

Michael was born in Mexico and raised in the United States. After receiving an honorable discharge from the United States Marine Corps, he enjoyed a successful career as a personal injury attorney. He is now retired and writes fiction full-time. Michael has been published in legal periodicals, but his true love is writing fiction. He’s been published in over thirty literary journals and magazines in the US, Canada, South America, and the UK. In his free time, he plays rhythm/lead guitar in a rock band, featuring 60’s and 70’s rock and roll.

In addition to his published novel, The Guadalupe Saints, Michael has completed several other manuscripts. One of those, The Pied Beauty of San Ignacio, is under active consideration for publication by Kensington Books (New York). In the meantime, he is polishing an additional manuscript, presently titled Titus of Galilee, to be sent out to potential publishers. You can find his latest anthology, Of Angels, Demons, and Chopped Chorizo, on Amazon.com.

Fiction: En Plena Vista by Michael Pacheco

Special Agent Varela thought he had the drug runner case in the bag. But out in the desert, where even the Yaqui didn’t tread, anything can happen.

Michael was born in Mexico and raised in the United States. After receiving an honorable discharge from the United States Marine Corps, he enjoyed a successful career as a personal injury attorney. He is now retired and writes fiction full-time. Michael has been published in legal periodicals, but his true love is writing fiction. He’s been published in over thirty literary journals and magazines in the US, Canada, South America, and the UK. In his free time, he plays rhythm/lead guitar in a rock band, featuring 60’s and 70’s rock and roll.

In addition to his published novel, The Guadalupe Saints, Michael has completed several other manuscripts. One of those, The Pied Beauty of San Ignacio, is under active consideration for publication by Kensington Books (New York). In the meantime, he is polishing an additional manuscript, presently titled Titus of Galilee, to be sent out to potential publishers. You can find his latest anthology, Of Angels, Demons, and Chopped Chorizo, on Amazon.com.

Behind the Scenes with Yara Flores

On the border between Mexico and Texas, where Yara grew up, the air is filled with a little light magic. In this episode, Yara talks about how this environment produced this gentle spooky tale.

Born in México and raised on the border, Yara is drawn to darker tales and is an aficionado of Mexican folklore. She attributes this to her own mother and abuela who told the best spooky stories around. Yara is a Latina dual language educator, mother and author who is passionate about representation and advocacy in all realms. As an elementary dual language (Spanish) educator of nearly a decade, she has been fortunate enough to gain a window into the exact type of literature that children are drawn to, and, also, what is missing within the current selection of literature for children. She has had short stories published in LatineLit magazine. Yara currently lives in Austin with my two daughters, husband and rescued Blue Heeler pup. You can follow her writing on Twitter at @Yariwrites

NonFiction: The Guardian/Alebrije by Yara Flores

“As the dementia accelerated, she claimed to see people at the window at night, including her beloved husband who had passed 5 years prior…Other, perhaps most sinister, nightly visitors, abuelita said, would whistle and try to convince her to unlatch the windows.”

Born in México and raised on the border, Yara is drawn to darker tales and is an aficionado of Mexican folklore. She attributes this to her own mother and abuela who told the best spooky stories around. Yara is a Latina dual language educator, mother and author who is passionate about representation and advocacy in all realms. As an elementary dual language (Spanish) educator of nearly a decade, she has been fortunate enough to gain a window into the exact type of literature that children are drawn to, and, also, what is missing within the current selection of literature for children. She has had short stories published in LatineLit magazine. Yara currently lives in Austin with my two daughters, husband and rescued Blue Heeler pup. You can follow her writing on Twitter at @Yariwrites.

Behind the Scenes with Kevin Casin, author of At Storm’s Edge

Is Flash Fiction the potato chip of the literary universe? Is there any difference between genre fiction and literary fiction? Tune in to this week’s behind-the-scenes episode to find out.

Kevin is a gay, Latino fiction writer, and cardiovascular research scientist. He is a second-generation immigrant born in Miami, Florida to Cuban and Colombian parents. For more about him, please see his website: https://kevinmcasin.wordpress.com/. Or follow his Twitter: @kevinthedruid.

Fiction: At Storm’s Edge by Kevin Casin

“Manuel heard the rattle of the seed curtain. He unfurled, cloaked in black, and looked up from his chair. Without a word–Seers never speak for themselves–he held out his hand over the table to welcome his guest and to accept payment for the card reading.

“Señor, me llamo Daniel. Please, mi family, will they survive the storm?” The man asked as he took a seat and offered a small, linen bag of coins.”

Kevin is a gay, Latino fiction writer, and cardiovascular research scientist. He is a second-generation immigrant born in Miami, Florida to Cuban and Colombian parents. For more about him, please see his website: https://kevinmcasin.wordpress.com/. Or follow his Twitter: @kevinthedruid.

Behind the Scenes with Toni Margarita Plummer, author of Attack of Las Quetas

Did Teresa really name a skin tag, a queta, Jabba the Queta? Can a story with body horror be hopeful? Tune in to find out the answer to these questions and more in this week’s episode.

Toni Margarita Plummer was born and raised in the San Gabriel Valley of Los Angeles, the daughter of a Mexican immigrant mother and white father. She is the author of the story collection The Bolero of Andi Rowe and winner of Somos En Escrito’s 2021 Extra Fiction Contest. A Macondo Fellow, her short fiction has been published in Aster(ix), Kweli, The Acentos Review, Hispanecdotes, and Hinchas de Poesía, among others. Plummer works in book publishing and serves on the board of Latinx in Publishing. She lives in the Hudson Valley. You can find her work at https://tonimargaritaplummer.wordpress.com  and on Twitter at @tmargaritaplum. You can also find out more about the mentorship programs from Latinx in Publishing at

Fiction: Attack of Las Quetas by Toni Margarita Plummer

On the one hand, family can be ultra-irritating; on the other, sometimes they’re the only ones that have your back. In Toni Margarita Plummer’s story, Attack of Las Quetas, family is there for the main character for better AND for worse. You’ll never look at a crochet hook the same way again.

Toni Margarita Plummer was born and raised in the San Gabriel Valley of Los Angeles, the daughter of a Mexican immigrant mother and white father. She is the author of the story collection The Bolero of Andi Rowe and winner of Somos En Escrito’s 2021 Extra Fiction Contest. A Macondo Fellow, her short fiction has been published in Aster(ix), Kweli, The Acentos Review, Hispanecdotes, and Hinchas de Poesía, among others. Plummer works in book publishing and serves on the board of Latinx in Publishing. She lives in the Hudson Valley. You can find her work at https://tonimargaritaplummer.wordpress.com  and on Twitter at